23 Jan

Air pressure

Where do you find the proper air pressure (PSI) for your vehicle’s tires?

You can find the original equipment (OE) on the vehicle placard, owner’s manual, or on the fuel door. On older vehicles, I’ve even found it in the glove box.
Many people think that the tire PSI stamped on their tires is how much air should go into their tires. This assumption, however well intended, is wrong. The information on the tire shows the maximum pressure you can use, but it makes no assumption on the vehicle usage. The tire that fits your vehicle will most likely fit several vehicles. Each of these vehicles would be a little different in weight and dimension. Subsequently, a tire that is the same OE size fits a variety of vehicles and can have different psi requirements for each vehicle.

Take these different cars for example:
1995 BMW 525i, its original equipment tire is a 205/65R15 94H.
1998 Ford Taurus, its original equipment tire is a P205/65R15 92T.
2000 Honda Accord, its original equipment tire is a P205/65R15 92V.

All use a 205/65R15, but none of them use the same air pressure in their tires.
1995 BMW 525i, its original equipment PSI is 26 psi front and 32 psi rear.
1998 Ford Taurus, its original equipment PSI is 33 psi front and 33 psi rear.
2000 Honda Accord, its original equipment PSI is 30 psi front and 30 psi rear.

None of these cars have the same PSI requirements, but they all drive on a 205/65R15. So the next time you check the air pressure in your tires, make sure to check with the vehicle manufacturer for the correct inflation pressure.

For more information see this informative video from Michelin.

Denny
TireCrawler.com